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 Post subject: A day in the life of Christopher Kimball’s Milk Street
PostPosted: Wed Feb 15, 2017 7:49 am 
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Location: Newton, MA
https://www.bostonglobe.com/lifestyle/f ... story.html


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 Post subject: Re: A day in the life of Christopher Kimball’s Milk Street
PostPosted: Wed Feb 15, 2017 7:28 pm 
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I just got my second issue of Milk Street, and the cover story was True Guacamole Clean, Simple, Bold. As I skipped to the recipe, I realized, upon seeing it, that it was the same recipe that I have been making since the 70s, and their source is the same as mine: Diana Kennedy! The one back then didn't have grape tomatoes, as I don't think that they were around yet, but it is the same, otherwise. I have tried countless recipes since, yet that remains my favorite, as the flavor of the avocado is not obscured. As much as I love garlic, this is one dish in which I prefer to leave it out. It is basically salsa fresca added to avocado - ripe tomatoes, chiles, a small amout of onion (I often use a small shallot, instead), and cilantro.

In the article about Diana Kennedy (still kickin' at 93!), there was a recipe that I think is the one from [/i]The Art Of Mexican Cooking[/i] ('83 I Think?), which I have made countless times: Shrimp In Chipotle Sauce. Unusual for Mexican, in that it has a small amount of white wine. I like it so much that it is in my "Blue Book" - my looseleaf notebook of my favorite recipes through the years, some tweaked to my taste, many as they were. This one, I remember, has one dried chipotle added to the canned ones, in the recipe.

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 Post subject: Re: A day in the life of Christopher Kimball’s Milk Street
PostPosted: Thu Feb 16, 2017 5:35 pm 
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Joined: Sat Dec 20, 2008 5:35 am
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Location: Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada
Close Dave, The Art of Mexican Cooking, 1989, recipe on p.207. Thanks for the tip; I'll try it this weekend. We finally have warm sunshine and melt!!


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 Post subject: Re: A day in the life of Christopher Kimball’s Milk Street
PostPosted: Thu Feb 16, 2017 6:15 pm 
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You'll enjoy that recipe, wino. I compared the recipe in her book and my blue book, and the only change I made was that one morita I added, for a little more heat and smokiness.

This recipe is saucier, and much less hot than another favorite Chipotle Shrimp of mine - the one in Rick Bayless's Mexican Kitchen.

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 Post subject: Re: A day in the life of Christopher Kimball’s Milk Street
PostPosted: Fri Feb 17, 2017 5:27 am 
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Location: Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada
My wife & I can't handle 'heat' anymore but we do love the chile flavors and smokiness. Are there chiles you can recommend? I'm good with roastng them, etc. and we have one store that sells about 10 dried varities - not sure of the names as I'm having coffee in bed :!: :lol: but I will get them.
THANKS :D


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 Post subject: Re: A day in the life of Christopher Kimball’s Milk Street
PostPosted: Fri Feb 17, 2017 8:34 am 
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Ancho is the most common chile in Mexican cooking, and is mild. Cascabel, pasilla, and guajillo are also common, and fairly mild. As for those canned chipotles, one brand that was mild has blue in the label - don't remember the name, of course. And if you like smoked dry chiles, but not the heat of chipotles or moritas, pasilla de Oaxaca is a milder one, but you will have to find it online, as it is not a common chile.

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 Post subject: Re: A day in the life of Christopher Kimball’s Milk Street
PostPosted: Fri Feb 17, 2017 9:10 am 
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There is a decent Mexican place close to me that serves this. My husband orders it every time and loves it. I am going to have to give it a try. Do you change anything Dave?


Karen


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 Post subject: Re: A day in the life of Christopher Kimball’s Milk Street
PostPosted: Fri Feb 17, 2017 9:17 am 
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Location: Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada
Again, thanks Dave :!:

Checking my cupboards I find guajillo and pasillos and way in the back some Kashmiri!!

I used the guajillos and pasillos when making Texas chili and the Kashmiris for curry.

It will be a good weekend :D :!:


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 Post subject: Re: A day in the life of Christopher Kimball’s Milk Street
PostPosted: Fri Feb 17, 2017 12:58 pm 
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Jaxallie wrote:
There is a decent Mexican place close to me that serves this. My husband orders it every time and loves it. I am going to have to give it a try. Do you change anything Dave?


Karen


I just add the one morita (small, dark chiles) or meco (larger, tan chipotles) to add more heat, as well as smoke flavor. I just put it in with the ingredients when blending smooth.

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 Post subject: Re: A day in the life of Christopher Kimball’s Milk Street
PostPosted: Sat Feb 18, 2017 4:15 pm 
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Wino,

For dried chiles for toasting and making into adobos and moles, I recommend guadillos, which are also the easiest pepper to seed & prep for adobo. Truly Mexican uses them in many recipes. Negros (dark Pasillas) are also fairly mild. One trick with the dried chiles is to make sure to really scrape off all of the seed webbing, which is where most of the capsaicin is.

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