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 Post subject: Re: Sabayon Tutorial - Hollandaise to Bearnaise
PostPosted: Wed Aug 10, 2011 4:38 pm 
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Okay, I made Eggs Benedict for breakfast. As I suspected, I do not love Eggs Benedict. The best I can say is that I don't hate them. What else can I put Hollandaise on? I have a butt-ton of it.


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 Post subject: Re: Sabayon Tutorial - Hollandaise to Bearnaise
PostPosted: Wed Aug 10, 2011 4:49 pm 
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Wonderful over veggies like asparagus, broccoli, etc. Also fantastic on steak and some fish.

Amy

P.S. Do you not like eggs? Or, is this simply a combination of flavors that doesn't appeal? I adore eggs benedict, and if my waistline and cholesterol would allow me, I'd have it at least once a week.


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 Post subject: Re: Sabayon Tutorial - Hollandaise to Bearnaise
PostPosted: Wed Aug 10, 2011 5:27 pm 
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Amy,

I'm not terribly keen on eggs when the white and yolk are separate. If the yolk is runny enough for me to mush them together, I usually like them just fine. Of course, I like them scrambled since the yolk and white are pre-combined. I thought this would be one I liked since I could mush, but I just do not like poached eggs and ham. (Okay Canadian bacon, but that's not a reference, is it?) It really felt too rich and that's coming from someone who devoured a quarter pan of brownies for her birthday.


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 Post subject: Re: Sabayon Tutorial - Hollandaise to Bearnaise
PostPosted: Thu Aug 11, 2011 8:36 pm 
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You do not like them in a box? You do not like them with a fox? You do not like poached eggs and ham!
I like hollandaise on broccoli.


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 Post subject: Re: Sabayon Tutorial - Hollandaise to Bearnaise
PostPosted: Thu Aug 11, 2011 9:42 pm 
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Location: Cordillera, Luzon, Philippines
Well golly gosh! If poached eggs are a fail, consider Amy's excellent suggestion in a different thread for making scrambled eggs "low and slow" aka the George Jacque (I hope this is the right name) version. Then plate with some Hollandaise. You have the best of both worlds, eggs without the offending egg white and the luxurious addition of a rich sauce. I don't know of any regulation that demands eggs be poached when served with Hollandaise.

In fact the idea of the sauce with scrambled eggs sounds good enough I will try it on the family next Sunday, if they are willing. I can try to improve my plating skills a bit!

And Hollandaise on poached fish or steamed veggies is quite the delight too, depending on their reception of the sauce with eggs, we may branch out in the future. It can be modified with mustard or tarragon to go over beef as well.

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Ancient Amerikano Adventuring Abroad: another fat guy up a mountain in the Philippines


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 Post subject: Re: Sabayon Tutorial - Hollandaise to Bearnaise
PostPosted: Fri Aug 12, 2011 8:13 am 
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Tatoosh wrote:
And Hollandaise on poached fish or steamed veggies is quite the delight too, depending on their reception of the sauce with eggs, we may branch out in the future. It can be modified with mustard or tarragon to go over beef as well.


By using different fats, liquids and seasoning, there are almost no limitations on sabayon sauces. One of my favorites is Julia Child's chicken sauteed with herbs and garlic with butter sauce. from "Mastering...".

    Chicken parts are lightly browned in a stick of butter. The pieces are seasoned before braising with garlic cloves. The flavorful juices/fats are then used to make a sabayon sauce. Absolutely the best Provencal chicken ever conceived.

I have also used Salmorra Sauce, Rouille and sausage fats to flavor sabayon sauces. The explorations continue...

If Baconaisse is made with bacon fat, is Bearnaise made with???

Tim


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 Post subject: Re: Sabayon Tutorial - Hollandaise to Bearnaise
PostPosted: Sat Aug 13, 2011 11:33 pm 
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Well, hats off to Tim! The culinary student and I made Hollandaise this morning. We did the sabayon as directed and it went smoothly. However, when adding the clarified butter, things unraveled and in true Hollandaise form, I'm not sure why. Hollandaise is notorious for breaking due to odd tides, unexpected breezes, and the stray hiccup by a neighbor three houses down. In this case it may have been, too much butter (doubtful), added too fast (slightly more possible), or over too much heat (most likely).

I whisked away at the egg yolks and cold water, it foamed, we heated, continuing to whisk, and it got quite thick. I'm pretty sure it was cooked through as I was right on the edge of scrambling, seeing one small chunk of solidifying egg. Off heat for at least 30 seconds, whisking away. Then back on heat while we added clarified butter. Went well at first, the butter incorporating easily. But then it broke. Which was okay, since I want the young culinary student to see what that looks like. Dash back to the computer and reread the "saving a broken sauce" part, so we heat up some water, add two tablespoons and voila, it comes back, rather thin, but not broken.

I move far away from the heat to limit temptation and whisk. Pretty soon it thickens again. We add the lemon juice, pepper and salt. It holds up well, so we make scrambled eggs and plate the sauce around the eggs. Tastes great! Even the brother in law is enjoying it and asks what else he can serve it over.

So while we can't make it often due to cholesterol considerations, we can do it occasionally and try a few variations along the way. Thank you Tim. It was very handy to have the instructions for making and repairing.

Steve aka Tatoosh

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Ancient Amerikano Adventuring Abroad: another fat guy up a mountain in the Philippines


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 Post subject: Re: Sabayon Tutorial - Hollandaise to Bearnaise
PostPosted: Sun Aug 14, 2011 3:14 am 
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Tatoosh/Steve,

You really need to get yourself a copy of James Peterson's Sauces. Preferably the 1st edition as it includes all of the derivative charts for the mother sauces. If you can buy from half.com in the Philippines, here is a copy for sale.

Amy


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 Post subject: Re: Sabayon Tutorial - Hollandaise to Bearnaise
PostPosted: Sun Aug 14, 2011 6:47 am 
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Thank you, Amy. That is a very good deal and something I should do. Actually there is a small storage unit in the wilds of Oregon with a few boxes of mine. In there, I am almost certain, is a copy of Peterson's excellent work. It was supposed to come over to the Philippines, but when a friend repacked some boxes for shipment - it, among others, apparently slipped out. The complete works of CI magazine through 2006, in their nice pristine green binding (as I remember it or was it blue?) are also languishing in the same storage unit. A nice selection of kitchen ware, culinary utensils and measuring equipment also remain tantalizingly out of reach.

Since my wife and I may return to the USA and live for awhile after she finishes her masters degree in Special Education, I've left the stuff there as a sort of seed for setting up again in the USA, even if only for a couple of years. But I do have a list of cookbooks and references I really want over here in the Philippines. I was hoping to get it in eBook or Kindle format, since I am getting my wife (hope she doesn't read this) a Kindle for Christmas so she can tote her texts and reference books to her classes in a more convenient form. Unhappily for me, when I took a peek over at Amazon, I saw it isn't available in electronic format.

Steve

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Ancient Amerikano Adventuring Abroad: another fat guy up a mountain in the Philippines


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 Post subject: Re: Sabayon Tutorial - Hollandaise to Bearnaise
PostPosted: Sun Aug 14, 2011 8:43 am 
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I use no heat normally when whisking in the butter. The butter is warm and the sabayon is cooked already, so it will incorporate without heat. It is possible you overcooked it slightly when whisking in the butter.


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