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 Post subject: Re: Modernist Cuisine
PostPosted: Fri Aug 26, 2011 11:16 am 
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Location: Telluride, CO
If it really has nothing to do with setting up the sodium citrate or iota carrageenan, then I think this is a wasted step. The cheese mixture melts just fine with the hot macaroni in a non-grated state.

Amy


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 Post subject: Re: Modernist Cuisine
PostPosted: Fri Aug 26, 2011 2:52 pm 
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Location: Six Shooter Junction, Texas
Paul Kierstead wrote:
SV is not necessary. Sodium Citrate and Iota (or Kappa ...) carrageenan is required. Basically you make a process cheese that melts without separating; that way you don't have to make a bechamel-based cheese sauce, and in turn the cheese flavour is much stronger. The following is one persons variation; I pretty much followed this variation. You can muck with the cheeses, but non-melting cheeses (less then 41% moisture) should not make up more then 30% of the cheese according to the book.

Note this is extremely rich, small portions are in order. Also note that the carrageenan and sodium citrate are not optional, they are key to the outcome.

From egullet, which is from the book.

The boiling of the pasta is slightly tricky and people have run into trouble with it; it has worked fine for me, but I think you need to watch out for boiling dry. I suspect you could do that conventionally, drain the pasta (reserving some pasta water, maybe pour a little back in) and then combine with the cheese.

Quote:
Whisk & simmer

100g water
75g (wheat) beer
10g sodium citrate
4.5g salt
1.25g iota carrageenan


Grate and combine over low heat:

140g aged gouda (was 200g)
145g aged cheddar (was 80g)


Stir until melted/emulsified. Pour into container; bring to room temp; freeze. Just before serving, pull it from the freezer and grate/shred 160g.

Boil over high heat:
300g water
100g macaroni
1g salt [down from 24.g]

Don't drain it. When pasta is al dente, add cheese and heat through until smooth and combined.

I then put it in a Le Creuset au gratin pan, topped it with seasoned breadcrumbs, and let it sit until the broiler for a couple of minutes.

Oh, and, yes, that's dried macaroni, not fresh.



Amy,

Is this the one you are talking about?

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 Post subject: Re: Modernist Cuisine
PostPosted: Fri Aug 26, 2011 3:02 pm 
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Location: Telluride, CO
Da Bull Man wrote:
Is this the one you are talking about?

Yes. It's awesome.

Amy


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 Post subject: Re: Modernist Cuisine
PostPosted: Fri Aug 26, 2011 3:04 pm 
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Location: Six Shooter Junction, Texas
Amy wrote:
Da Bull Man wrote:
Is this the one you are talking about?

Yes. It's awesome.

Amy


carrageenan

Isn't he an actor?

Whats all them funny measurements? Who make a wheat beer?

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 Post subject: Re: Modernist Cuisine
PostPosted: Fri Aug 26, 2011 3:13 pm 
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Welcome to the new ways of looking at cooking...

You have to order the sodium citrate and the iota (or kappa) carrageenan, but I'll guarantee you, this is the best mac 'n cheese "base" recipe you'll come across. Your girls would love it...a lot like Kraft, only real.

Amy


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 Post subject: Re: Modernist Cuisine
PostPosted: Sun Aug 28, 2011 8:36 am 
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Posts: 1244
Amy & Paul, thanks for the recipe and tips. For some reason I envisioned putting cheese and macaroni in a vac sealed bag and heating it....


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 Post subject: Re: Modernist Cuisine
PostPosted: Wed May 30, 2012 7:00 pm 
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Posts: 170
Just saw this - the announcement of a new "home version" of Modernist Cuisine - this one being filled with home recipes and available at a discounted price ($140!).

http://www.oregonlive.com/foodday/index ... _prom.html

Gerard


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 Post subject: Re: Modernist Cuisine
PostPosted: Thu May 31, 2012 7:46 am 
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Location: Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada
Thanks, Gerard, it's on the list!


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 Post subject: Re: Modernist Cuisine
PostPosted: Thu May 31, 2012 8:18 pm 
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Posts: 170
Here's the description from Amazon:

Modernist Cuisine at Home [Hardcover]
Nathan Myhrvold (Author), Maxime Bilet (Author)


Book Description
Publication Date: October 8, 2012

The culinary revolution that has transformed restaurant menus around the world is also making its way into home kitchens. The Cooking Lab, publisher of the encyclopedic six-volume set Modernist Cuisine, which immediately became the definitive reference for this revolution, has now produced a lavishly illustrated guide for home cooks, complete with all-new recipes tailored for cooking enthusiasts of all skill levels.

Modernist Cuisine at Home, by Nathan Myhrvold with Maxime Bilet, is destined to set a new standard for home cookbooks. The authors have collected in this 456-page volume all the essential information that any cook needs to stock a modern kitchen, to master Modernist techniques, and to make hundreds of stunning recipes. The book includes a spiral-bound Kitchen Manual that reprints all of the recipes and reference tables on waterproof, tear-resistant paper. Drawing on the same commitment to perfection that produced Modernist Cuisine, Modernist Cuisine at Home applies innovations pioneered by The Cooking Lab to refine classic home dishes, from hamburgers and wings to macaroni and cheese. More than 400 new recipes are included, most with step-by-step photos that make it easy to bring dining of the highest quality to your own dinner table.
Among the amazing techniques you’ll find are:
• how to cook fish and steak perfectly every time, whether you’re in the kitchen, the backyard, or tailgating in a parking lot;
• how to use a pressure cooker to make stocks in a fraction of the usual time while capturing more of the flavor;
• the secret to making quick, sumptuous caramelized vegetable soups and purees;
• how to outfit your home oven to make pizzas as crispy as you would get from a wood-fired brick oven;
along with recipes for:
• perfect eggs and breathtaking omelets that remove the guesswork for stress-free breakfasts, even for a crowd;
• gravies and a hollandaise sauce that are wonderfully rich, perfectly smooth, and never separate;
• a flawless cheeseburger and an ultrafrothy milk shake;
• chicken wings made better with Modernist techniques, plus seven great sauces and coatings for them;
• macaroni and cheese, including stove-top, baked, and fat-free versions, that can be made with any cheese blend you like, from gouda and cheddar to jack and Stilton.

Cooking like a Modernist chef at home requires the right set of tools, but they’re less expensive and easier to find than you might think. You’ll also learn how to get the best out of the kitchen appliances you already own. Learn how to use your microwave oven to steam fish and vegetables to perfection, make exceptional beef jerky, and fry delicate herbs.

The first 100 pages of the book are a trove of useful information, such as:
• how to test the accuracy of a thermometer, and why it’s time to switch to digital;
• how to use (and not to use) a blowtorch to sear food fast and beautifully;
• how to marinate meats more quickly evenly by injecting the brine;
• the myriad uses for a whipping siphon beyond whipped cream;
• why those expensive copper pans may not be worth the price;
• how to deep-fry without a deep fryer;
• how to stop worrying and get the most out of your pressure cooker;
• how to cook sous vide at home with improvised equipment, a special-purpose water bath, or a home combi oven.

Modernist Cuisine at Home is an indispensable guide for anyone who is passionate about food and cooking.


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 Post subject: Re: Modernist Cuisine
PostPosted: Mon Nov 04, 2013 8:39 pm 
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Posts: 2061
At last, a book for those who want to know how the pretty, pretty pictures were made.

http://www.npr.org/blogs/thesalt/2013/11/04/241848440/how-to-levitate-a-sandwich-modern-cuisine-spills-photo-secrets?ft=1&f=1001


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