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 Post subject: Re: Modernist Cuisine
PostPosted: Thu Aug 18, 2011 11:00 am 
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Joined: Fri Dec 19, 2008 10:45 pm
Posts: 1522
Location: Ottawa, ON
Oops, looking at one of my postings on eg, I used gouda as one of the cheeses. IIRC, it does matter in terms of which type of cheese, but I think the recipe describes everything fairly well.


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 Post subject: Re: Modernist Cuisine
PostPosted: Thu Aug 18, 2011 11:05 am 
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Joined: Thu Dec 18, 2008 7:37 pm
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Location: Telluride, CO
I love aged gouda, but have to go to my big market to get it. And, I'm just not in the mood to drive there today. I think I'm going to do pork two ways with this as a side for dinner. I'll figure out veggie when I see what the market has.

Thanks,

Amy


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 Post subject: Re: Modernist Cuisine
PostPosted: Sat Aug 20, 2011 9:03 pm 
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Location: Telluride, CO
So, I finally got around to pork two ways tonight, using pretty only modernist techniques. The Modernist Cuisine mac 'n cheese is awesome...totally cheesy, and I think will likely reheat well...something you definitely cannot say about traditional mac 'n cheese.

Amy


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 Post subject: Re: Modernist Cuisine
PostPosted: Tue Aug 23, 2011 2:59 pm 
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Location: Ottawa, ON
Recent things from MC has been the baby beets (from the baby beet salad); really great, lots of baby beets available here now. Also did glazed pearl onions; also tried Keller's version of glazed pearl onions, which is hybrid of traditional method and SV; I prefer Keller's in this case.

Attachment:
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Beets all ready to go.


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 Post subject: Re: Modernist Cuisine
PostPosted: Thu Aug 25, 2011 10:28 pm 
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Location: Telluride, CO
Love beets! If only Andy did...sigh.

I made more mac 'n cheese today from the extra base I froze the other night. omg...it's as if I just made it!

This is my new "go to" method. Now that I understand the basics of the modernist technique, I'll incorporate my own techniques and develop my own recipe.

Long live really flavorful mac 'n cheese that doesn't get dry and chewy after 30 minutes!

Amy


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 Post subject: Re: Modernist Cuisine
PostPosted: Fri Aug 26, 2011 7:33 am 
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Mac & Cheese lasts longer than 30 minutes?


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 Post subject: Re: Modernist Cuisine
PostPosted: Fri Aug 26, 2011 7:39 am 
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Amy, do you think the mac 'n' cheese would work in a crockpot sous vide setup? If so, can you share a recipe? I love mac 'n' cheese but can't stand it when reheated - and I always make too much. TIA.


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 Post subject: Re: Modernist Cuisine
PostPosted: Fri Aug 26, 2011 7:58 am 
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Location: Ottawa, ON
SV is not necessary. Sodium Citrate and Iota (or Kappa ...) carrageenan is required. Basically you make a process cheese that melts without separating; that way you don't have to make a bechamel-based cheese sauce, and in turn the cheese flavour is much stronger. The following is one persons variation; I pretty much followed this variation. You can muck with the cheeses, but non-melting cheeses (less then 41% moisture) should not make up more then 30% of the cheese according to the book.

Note this is extremely rich, small portions are in order. Also note that the carrageenan and sodium citrate are not optional, they are key to the outcome.

From egullet, which is from the book.

The boiling of the pasta is slightly tricky and people have run into trouble with it; it has worked fine for me, but I think you need to watch out for boiling dry. I suspect you could do that conventionally, drain the pasta (reserving some pasta water, maybe pour a little back in) and then combine with the cheese.

Quote:
Whisk & simmer

100g water
75g (wheat) beer
10g sodium citrate
4.5g salt
1.25g iota carrageenan


Grate and combine over low heat:

140g aged gouda (was 200g)
145g aged cheddar (was 80g)


Stir until melted/emulsified. Pour into container; bring to room temp; freeze. Just before serving, pull it from the freezer and grate/shred 160g.

Boil over high heat:
300g water
100g macaroni
1g salt [down from 24.g]

Don't drain it. When pasta is al dente, add cheese and heat through until smooth and combined.

I then put it in a Le Creuset au gratin pan, topped it with seasoned breadcrumbs, and let it sit until the broiler for a couple of minutes.

Oh, and, yes, that's dried macaroni, not fresh.


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 Post subject: Re: Modernist Cuisine
PostPosted: Fri Aug 26, 2011 8:50 am 
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Location: Telluride, CO
Paul Kierstead wrote:
The boiling of the pasta is slightly tricky and people have run into trouble with it; it has worked fine for me, but I think you need to watch out for boiling dry. I suspect you could do that conventionally, drain the pasta (reserving some pasta water, maybe pour a little back in) and then combine with the cheese.

That concerned me the first time I made it because of my altitude, so I added just a little bit more water as it just takes pasta longer to cook "high and dry."

When I made it yesterday I didn't measure the pasta or water at all and just made it reserving a little of the pasta water. Worked just fine.

Also, I know it says to grate the cheese mixture once it gets cold, but I didn't bother.

Amy

Edited to add: Paul, just noticed the recipe you posted called for you to freeze the cheese mixture, then grate. In the book, it only calls for you to refrigerate it until cold, then grate. I'm not really sure what the point of this step is. Do you know?


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 Post subject: Re: Modernist Cuisine
PostPosted: Fri Aug 26, 2011 10:50 am 
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Location: Ottawa, ON
I think it is to make it more grate-able. This recipe has been kicking around from before the book actually came out, I think, so there are some variations. Certainly mine would not be grateable just out of the fridge (and was not); I just sliced it in more or less in the end for the most part.


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