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 Post subject: tri tip
PostPosted: Sun Jun 17, 2012 5:18 pm 
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Joined: Tue Oct 27, 2009 1:30 am
Posts: 170
Has anyone tried sous vide tri tip? I've been hearing good things but since I'm not familiar with the cut (other than it's from the sirloin), I'm kind of lost.

From what I can gather - there is a difference between a tri tip roast and tri tip steaks. Unfortunately, most recipes don't specify which they use - although judging from the pics, I'd say most are using a roast.

That said, Ruhlman/Keller suggest 135 degrees 1 hour (for a 2 lb roast). For medium rare, Baldwin suggests 130 for 6-8 hrs for the steak and 130 for 8-12 hours for the roast. On the other hand, "cookingsousvide.com" suggests 131 degrees for 2-10 hours. Various bloggers have chimed in, only making matters more confusing (i.e. 128-135 for 45-60 minutes; 140 degrees for 3-5 hours).

Any help would be greatly appreciated!

Best,
Gerard


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 Post subject: Re: tri tip
PostPosted: Mon Jun 18, 2012 6:40 pm 
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Location: Telluride, CO
I've not done any roasts, but having done steaks of similar cut, I'd say Rhulman/Keller are closest to the timing. Are you doing a roast or a steak?

Amy


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 Post subject: Re: tri tip
PostPosted: Tue Jun 19, 2012 2:32 pm 
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Hi Amy,

Thanks for responding. FWIW, I'm planning on doing a roast. From what I understand - roasts usually come in somewhere around 3 lbs. I think I'm OK with Ruhlman/Keller's time for steaks - but for a roast - I'm not sure. Then again - I don't know what these roasts look like and if it's thin, I guess I would be comfortable with a short time. For right now, if the roast has any thickness, I'm thinking about 3-5 hours. I'll keep you posted.

Best,
Gerard


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 Post subject: Re: tri tip
PostPosted: Wed Jun 20, 2012 12:23 pm 
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Joined: Tue Aug 11, 2009 6:36 am
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Location: Springfield, IL
Gerard,

I've no experience with sous vide, but translating from my reverse sear experience.

If you plan on searing or blast roasting to brown the tri-tip, you do not want to sous vide that roast above 110-120. You can expect the interior to rise about 10 degrees if you brown the roast.

Tim


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 Post subject: Re: tri tip
PostPosted: Wed Jun 20, 2012 12:52 pm 
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Joined: Fri Dec 19, 2008 10:45 pm
Posts: 1522
Location: Ottawa, ON
I plugged the following into my SV app (Sous Vide Dash, iOS):
Assume the meat is a cylinder. Assume the cylinder is 75mm diameter (roughly 3")
Set water temperature to 56 C
Assume starting temperature is 5 C (fridge temp)
The time for the core to read 56 is about 3 hours.

You won't be able to do much thicker then this using equilibrium (same water as core temp) because your time for the core to get above 55 will exceed 4 hours. This puts the core in the "danger zone" for more then 4 hours. You could use a higher water temp for something thicker, but that will result in a more cooked exterior.

Generally, in SV, there is no particular reason to do a full roast (though it still looks good and is nice to slice...); you can slice it or make 'individual' roasts and cook those. For example, 30mm thick beef medallions get to temp (56C) in under an hour.

For finishing, you can use a torch to really reduce the amount of temperature rise. A very very hot cast iron pan also helps, but it will be very smokey. But effective. If you try it in the oven or even broiler, you'll generally need the kind of temperatures Tim is saying as the rise will definitely be larger due to the longer time, though there is zero carry over from the orginal cook, so it is lower then even the reverse sear (unless you got one of those super fancy euro ovens that can easily do sub 60 C temps)


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 Post subject: Re: tri tip
PostPosted: Sat Jun 30, 2012 9:03 am 
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Finally got some results (for better or worse). Made the tri-tip last Sunday. The roast was a little under 2 lbs and the thickness ranged from 1-2", though most was closer to 1.5". Seasoned, vacuum sealed, and placed in water bath at 132 degrees. Meant to do 3 hours but it wound up being for 5 hrs. Five days later, took it out of the bag - dried it off, put it back in the water bath at same temperature for about 45-60 minutes and seared in a hot AC SS skillet. Used grapeseed oil - seared for about 45 seconds on each side.

The meat turned brown but not the dark brown that comes with serious carmelization except in some spots. Cutting into it, the meat was nicely pink. The taste was terrific. I don't think it was too mushy although I could be wrong on this. There were 1-2 places in the meat where there were small lines of internal fat that had not completely melted. Not sure if this meant I should have kept in in the water bath for a longer time or not.

For searing, I'm trying to avoid using a blow torch - in part because I'm concerned about the taste of the gas on the meat. Somewhere I read that if you use a chinois as a shield, the taste can be minimized.

I have an electric (glass) stove top so a cast iron skillet is risky (according to the manufacturer). I've used an All-Clad SS frying pan. The pan does get hot and the oil starts to smokes - but I'm scared of having the pan smoking for very long. To me, the oil is limiting how hot the pan gets and that even a oil with a hot smoke point isn't nearly as good as a grill.

I though I might use a round le creuset grill pan that I have - kicking that all the way up to high and brushing some oil right on the steak. That way the smoking point of the oil wouldn't act as a ceiling for the temperature of the pan.

Any thoughts?

Best,
Gerard


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 Post subject: Re: tri tip
PostPosted: Sun Jul 01, 2012 12:30 am 
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Location: Telluride, CO
Happy for your success!

A few thoughts...I probably wouldn't have gone as long in my initial bath. Instinct says the roast was probably done after two hours. Typically when reheating, it's advised to go back into the bath at a lower temp...for this probably about 120 would do fine. (You're only trying to reheat and not to cook, so you don't wnt to have too high a temp.)

Working on electric where cast iron is not recommended will be a challenge for getting your sear, but I totally agree about not using a torch. I never have and (never say never) never will. I agree with your idea to oil the meat instead of the pan next time. I might wipe the pan with a paper cloth oil rag just before the meat goes into it though just to give a boost to not sticking. Anything you can do to get the hottest possible pan ( or just buy an induction charbroiler ;) ) will help to solve your sear problems.

Amy


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 Post subject: Re: tri tip
PostPosted: Sun Jul 01, 2012 6:34 am 
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Thanks for your comments Amy and I'm going to follow your advice. In fact, I was going to make another tri-tip today but guess what, no electricity because of the storms that went through here two nights ago! So, that'll have to wait until power is restored. Not fun when it's going to be 97 today (without AC and by that I do not mean All Clad) and in the 90's for the rest of the week!

Getting back to the sear issue, I was wondering whether changing pans might help. My first thought was just to heat up my SS AC frying pan for 5 minutes at the highest setting and then sear as noted above. However, I'm kind of scared that it might warp the pan a bit. I'm not sure if that fear is well founded but I know AC suggests not using very high heat. The problem is that if it warps, even just a little, it's a real pain to use on a glass top stove. What happens is that every time you stir (assuming you are not holding the pan with the other hand), the pan spins - and spins right off the heating element. That in turn heats the glass which results in the stove being shut off.... which means going to the fuse box and having to reset everything. Ugh! Now you can see why I have such oven/stove envy for those of you with beautiful gas ovens!

On the other hand, I have a circular le creuset grill pan that I bought on ebay for just a few dollars, use infrequently, and don't need to stir. I'm just thinking of heathing that up for 5-10 minutes on high and taking my chances.

I will look into the induction charbroiler as well. I never even heard of that and that gives me some additional hope.

Hope you are well (and safe!). Hoping our electricity is turned on sooner than later but they are saying that it might take until the end of the week!

Best,
Gerard


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 Post subject: Re: tri tip
PostPosted: Sun Jul 01, 2012 7:55 am 
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Location: Telluride, CO
Gerard,

I'd give the LC a try. If you wreck the pan, who cares for what you paid for it.

And, I was kind of kidding about the charbroiler. BlueStar makes one, but it requires a cutout, and isn't cheap.

Amy

P.S. Stay cool, if you can.


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 Post subject: Re: tri tip
PostPosted: Sun Jul 01, 2012 9:59 pm 
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Joined: Fri Dec 19, 2008 10:45 pm
Posts: 1522
Location: Ottawa, ON
I consistently use an Itawni butane torch (note this is not the wee brulee torch, but considerably bigger) without any taste of gas. Dave Arnold (cooking issues), who I greatly respect, suggested the stainless mesh if you torch has uncombusted gases or high levels of the oderants which tip you off to butane. I have, however, have not had any trouble (but could be dim, lucky or have poor taste buds). When I used to use propane, I think I had a hint of propane flavour on occasion (hence the switch to butane). In addition, it only works well on beef and pork in my experience; really well on beef, generally well on pork. It works on dark poultry, but not particularly well on white poultry. It doesn't work for shit on fish. You have to put pepper/other surface things on after the torch. If the meat has lots of fat, you have to look out as it will light the fat on fire if you aren't careful. However, it helps render fat as typical SV temps do not render fat (as you noticed) which one of the reasons you see mostly lean cuts recommended. As always, your mileage may vary.


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