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 Post subject: Hungarian sweet paprika
PostPosted: Wed Sep 21, 2011 4:35 pm 
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Location: Florida Gulf Coast
A couple friends of mine just came back from a trip down the Danube, and brought me a large package of sweet paprika from Hungary. Package says " Csipmentes Sweet SuB" (there are 2 dots over that u). I've never used paprika much except for garnishing potato salad & deviled eggs.

Do any of you fabulous folks have ideas for really showcasing it in a dish? I'd like to have my friends over when I use it, and it would be nice if I could make it a highlight rather than an afterthought.

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 Post subject: Re: Hungarian sweet paprika
PostPosted: Wed Sep 21, 2011 5:46 pm 
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Joined: Fri Aug 28, 2009 10:48 am
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Location: Near Ithaca, NY
This one, which my bunch (strangley) enjoys. Strange, because they usually don't like anything new.






Published November 1, 2008. From Cook's Illustrated.



Why this recipe works:


We wanted our Hungarian goulash recipe to have tender braised beef packed with paprika flavor. Pureeing the paprika with roasted red peppers and tomato paste imparted vibrant flavor without the grittiness we had gotten when using larger quanti...(more)

Serves 6


Do not substitute hot, half-sharp, or smoked Spanish paprika for the sweet paprika in the stew (see our recommended brands at right), as they will compromise the flavor of the dish. Since paprika is vital to this recipe, it is best to use a fresh container. We prefer chuck-eye roast, but any boneless roast from the chuck will work. Cook the stew in a Dutch oven with a tight-fitting lid. (Alternatively, to ensure a tight seal, place a sheet of foil over the pot before adding the lid.) The stew can be cooled, covered tightly, and refrigerated for up to 2 days; wait to add the optional sour cream until after reheating. Before reheating, skim the hardened fat from the surface and add enough water to the stew to thin it slightly. Serve the stew over boiled potatoes or egg noodles.

Ingredients
1 (3 1/2- to 4-pound) boneless beef chuck-eye roast , trimmed of excess fat and cut into 1 1/2-inch cubes (see note)
Salt
1/3cup sweet paprika (see note)
1(12-ounce) jar roasted red peppers , drained and rinsed (about 1 cup)
2tablespoons tomato paste
3teaspoons white vinegar
2tablespoons vegetable oil
4large onions , diced small (about 6 cups)
4large carrots , peeled and cut into 1-inch-thick rounds (about 2 cups)
1 bay leaf
1cup beef broth , warmed
1/4cup sour cream (optional; see note)
Ground black pepper

Instructions

1. Adjust oven rack to lower-middle position and heat oven to 325 degrees. Sprinkle meat evenly with 1 teaspoon salt and let stand 15 minutes. Process paprika, roasted peppers, tomato paste, and 2 teaspoons vinegar in food processor until smooth, 1 to 2 minutes, scraping down sides as needed.


2. Combine oil, onions, and 1 teaspoon salt in large Dutch oven; cover and set over medium heat. Cook, stirring occasionally, until onions soften but have not yet begun to brown, 8 to 10 minutes. (If onions begin to brown, reduce heat to medium-low and stir in 1 tablespoon water.)


3. Stir in paprika mixture; cook, stirring occasionally, until onions stick to bottom of pan, about 2 minutes. Add beef, carrots, and bay leaf; stir until beef is well coated. Using rubber spatula, scrape down sides of pot. Cover pot and transfer to oven. Cook until meat is almost tender and surface of liquid is ½ inch below top of meat, 2 to 21/2 hours, stirring every 30 minutes. Remove pot from oven and add enough beef broth so that surface of liquid is ¼ inch from top of meat (beef should not be fully submerged). Return covered pot to oven and continue to cook until fork slips easily in and out of beef, about 30 minutes longer.


4. Skim fat off surface; stir in remaining teaspoon vinegar and sour cream, if using. Remove bay leaf, adjust seasonings with salt and pepper, and serve.



Recipe Testing

Skipping the Sear, but Not the Flavor


Most stews begin by browning meat on the stovetop to boost flavor. They also call for lots of added liquid. Our recipe skips the sear and goes into a moderate 325-degree oven. Though this relatively low temperature can’t compare with the sizzling heat of a 500-degree skillet, over time, the dry top layer of meat will reach 300 degrees—the temperature at which the meat begins to brown, forming thousands of new flavor compounds. But only the top of the meat will brown; due to the surrounding liquid, the submerged part of the meat can’t rise above the boiling point of water, or 212 degrees Fahrenheit.

RISING ABOVE IT ALL
Even at a relatively low oven temperature, our method still triggers browning—but only on the "dry" part of the meat above the liquid.



Recipe Testing

Smooth Spice Solution


The large quantity of paprika in authentic Hungarian goulash can turn it gritty. Here are two solutions.

COMMERCIAL CONVENIENCE
Hard-to-find Hungarian paprika cream is a smooth blend of paprika and red bell peppers.


HOMEMADE SOLUTION
We created our own quick version by pureeing dried paprika with roasted red peppers and a little tomato paste and vinegar.

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 Post subject: Re: Hungarian sweet paprika
PostPosted: Thu Sep 22, 2011 7:57 am 
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Joined: Thu Jul 23, 2009 9:58 am
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Location: Florida Gulf Coast
Thank you! That's just what I'm looking for.

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 Post subject: Re: Hungarian sweet paprika
PostPosted: Thu Sep 22, 2011 8:06 am 
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Joined: Tue Aug 11, 2009 6:36 am
Posts: 894
Location: Springfield, IL
Hi,

Chicken Paprikash would be wonderful. (CI's recipe is terrible. imho.)

Tim


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 Post subject: Re: Hungarian sweet paprika
PostPosted: Thu Sep 22, 2011 9:41 am 
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Location: Florida Gulf Coast
Tim,

I've never had either Hungarian Goulash or Chicken Paprikash, so I'm no judge of a good one or bad one. Do you have, or can you refer me to a good recipe for the chicken?

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 Post subject: Re: Hungarian sweet paprika
PostPosted: Thu Sep 22, 2011 11:48 am 
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Location: Springfield, IL
Hi,


Aunt Fr1eda’s Chicken Paprikash - Tim's Version

Ingredients:
    Original ---- Tim’s cheater ideas

    1 Tbsp. lard ---- butter/canola mix
    1 large onion, chopped ---- no changes here
    1 small green pepper, chopped ---- medium red pepper, chopped
    1 Tbsp. salt ---- 2 Tbsp. Kosher salt
    1 1/2 Tbsp. paprika ---- 1 1/2 Tbsp. paprika sweet and semi-hot mix
    1 cup water
    1 boullion cube ---- 1 cup brown chicken stock
    4 Pounds chicken parts ---- 4 pounds chicken thighs
    1 cup sour cream ---- 1 cup crème fraiche

Procedures:

Heat butter/oil in a heavy sauté pan. Saute onion and pepper to soften. Stir in some salt and paprika. Remove the vegetables to a bowl.

Season and saute the chicken pieces to light golden brown. Begin with the white meat and remove to a separate covered bowl. Continue sautéing the dark meat.

Return vegetables to the pan on top of the dark meat. Add stock and bring to simmer. Cover and simmer on low for 20 minutes. Nestle the white meat pieces into the pan, cover and simmer for another 20 minutes.

Remove chicken. Add sour cream/crème fraiche and stir while simmering. Adjust seasoning before serving.


Last edited by Tim on Thu Sep 29, 2011 11:19 am, edited 1 time in total.

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 Post subject: Re: Hungarian sweet paprika
PostPosted: Fri Sep 23, 2011 1:27 pm 
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Joined: Thu Jul 23, 2009 9:58 am
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Location: Florida Gulf Coast
That sounds good, too. I have plenty of paprika, so I'm going to try both recipes.

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 Post subject: Re: Hungarian sweet paprika
PostPosted: Sat Sep 24, 2011 7:48 pm 
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Posts: 733
Location: Michigan
I was also going to sugest Chicken Paprikash. Lucky you, you have plenty to try both recipe's and then some.

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 Post subject: Re: Hungarian sweet paprika
PostPosted: Wed Sep 28, 2011 4:00 pm 
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WOW! Tonight, I made Tim's version of Chicken Paprikash. This will definitely get an encore performance.

I only made one change. I didn't have a fresh red bell pepper (or any other color), so I took a note from KSS's goulash and used some roasted red pepper from a jar. And I added a little garlic, just cause everything needs garlic. I guess that's 2 changes.

Thanks, Tim. This is going in the rotation.

Now, on to the goulash!

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 Post subject: Re: Hungarian sweet paprika
PostPosted: Thu Sep 29, 2011 7:47 am 
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Location: Springfield, IL
SilverSage wrote:
WOW! Tonight, I made Tim's version of Chicken Paprikash. This will definitely get an encore performance.

I only made one change. I didn't have a fresh red bell pepper (or any other color), so I took a note from KSS's goulash and used some roasted red pepper from a jar. And I added a little garlic, just cause everything needs garlic. I guess that's 2 changes.

Thanks, Tim. This is going in the rotation.

Now, on to the goulash!


Sage,

That is really nice of you to say. Now, what version did you make?

Lib and I constantly kid each other about this recipe. I contend that Frieda Trefftzs was a pre-curser of Sandra Lee. Lib says I have taken wonderful Swiss comfort food and made it pretentious; maybe I'll add white truffles to the recipe.

In truth, her seven aunts were all wonderful cooks.

Tim


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